Your direct supplier on solar inverter, solar controller, solar battery , solar panel, solar lamp and solar systems. Welcome you invest our new factory and work together!
Hello,Welcome!  Login  Register      sitemaps | Board | My Orders | My Wellsee
Hot search: Solar inverter | voltage inverter | charger inverter | sine wave inverter | off-grid inverter | solar controller | MPPT | solar panel | charge controller | solar regulator
Your Position: > Knowledge >> Solar system >>> what is solar energy

what is solar energy

Cindy / 2013-09-22
[B] [M] [S]

 Energy causes things to happen around us. Look out the window.

During the day, the sun gives out light and heat energy. At night, street lamps use electrical energy to light our way.

When a car drives by, it is being powered by gasoline, a type of stored energy.

The food we eat contains energy. We use that energy to work and play.

We learned the definition of energy in the introduction:

"Energy Is the Ability to Do Work."

Energy can be found in a number of different forms. It can be chemical energy, electrical energy, heat (thermal energy), light (radiant energy), mechanical energy, and nuclear energy.

We have always used the energy of the sun as far back as humans have existed on this planet. As far back as 5,000 years ago, people "worshipped" the sun. Ra, the sun-god, who was considered the first king of Egypt. In Mesopotamia, the sun-god Shamash was a major deity and was equated with justice. In Greece there were two sun deities, Apollo and Helios. The influence of the sun also appears in other religions – Zoroastrianism, Mithraism, Roman religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, the Druids of England, the Aztecs of Mexico, the Incas of Peru, and many Native American tribes.

We know today, that the sun is simply our nearest star. Without it, life would not exist on our planet. We use the sun's energy every day in many different ways.

When we hang laundry outside to dry in the sun, we are using the sun's heat to do work – drying our clothes.

Plants use the sun's light to make food. Animals eat plants for food. And as we learned in Chapter 5, decaying plants hundreds of millions of years ago produced the coal, oil and natural gas that we use today. So, fossil fuels is actually sunlight stored millions and millions of years ago.

Indirectly, the sun or other stars are responsible for ALL our energy. Even nuclear energy comes from a star because the uranium atoms used in nuclear energy were created in the fury of a nova – a star exploding.

We can also change the sunlight directly to electricity using solar cells.

Solar cells are also called photovoltaic cells – or PV cells for short – and can be found on many small appliances, like calculators, and even on spacecraft. They were first developed in the 1950s for use on U.S. space satellites. They are made of silicon, a special type of melted sand.

When sunlight strikes the solar cell, electrons (red circles) are knocked loose. They move toward the treated front surface (dark blue color). An electron imbalance is created between the front and back. When the two surfaces are joined by a connector, like a wire, a current of electricity occurs between the negative and positive sides.

These individual solar cells are arranged together in a PV module and the modules are grouped together in an array. Some of the arrays are set on special tracking devices to follow sunlight all day long.

 The electrical energy from solar cells can then be used directly. It can be used in a home for lights and appliances. It can be used in a business. Solar energy can be stored in batteries to light a roadside billboard at night. Or the energy can be stored in a battery for an emergency roadside cellular telephone when no telephone wires are around.

Some experimental cars also use PV cells. They convert sunlight directly into energy to power electric motors on the car.

But when most of us think of solar energy, we think of satellites in outer space. Here's a picture of solar panels extending out from a satellite.

We can also change the sunlight directly to electricity using solar cells.

Solar cells are also called photovoltaic cells – or PV cells for short – and can be found on many small appliances, like calculators, and even on spacecraft. They were first developed in the 1950s for use on U.S. space satellites. They are made of silicon, a special type of melted sand.

When sunlight strikes the solar cell, electrons (red circles) are knocked loose. They move toward the treated front surface (dark blue color). An electron imbalance is created between the front and back. When the two surfaces are joined by a connector, like a wire, a current of electricity occurs between the negative and positive sides.

These individual solar cells are arranged together in a PV module and the modules are grouped together in an array. Some of the arrays are set on special tracking devices to follow sunlight all day long.

 The electrical energy from solar cells can then be used directly. It can be used in a home for lights and appliances. It can be used in a business. Solar energy can be stored in batteries to light a roadside billboard at night. Or the energy can be stored in a battery for an emergency roadside cellular telephone when no telephone wires are around.

Some experimental cars also use PV cells. They convert sunlight directly into energy to power electric motors on the car.

But when most of us think of solar energy, we think of satellites in outer space. Here's a picture of solar panels extending out from a satellite.

User Comment

No comment
Username: Anonymous user
E-mail:
Rank:
Content:
Verification code: captcha

View History

vedio center products center Honor Knowledge Outstanding Articles
Bluelight History  |  About Us  |  Honor  |  Knowledge  |  Feedback  |  Service  |  Company profile  |  Contact Us

© 2005-2018 Wellsee solar supply Copyright, All Rights Reserved.
Wuhan Wellsee New Energy. Block D, Zhongli Enterprise Building, No. 92, Wuhan Boulevard, Wuchang District, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Tel: 0086-13986203125,13986203097,13971182531 E-mail: sales@e-bluelight.com,admin@e-bluelight.com
skype:Cindy
cindywellseeCindy cindywellsee  skype:Doris
doriswellseeDoris doriswellsee  skype:Tracy
tracywellseeTracy tracywellsee  skype:Owen
sarawellseeOwen sarawellsee
Run 115 queries, spents 0.194291 seconds, 59 people online,Gzip enabled,take up memory 3.856 MB